The dangers of using cocaine

Cocaine has a high potential for abuse, physical and psychological dependence, and poses many serious health risk to users.

The dangers of using cocaine

Not only does the method of ingesting cocaine alter the immediate side effects, it also leads to different long-term effects: Snorting can lead to losing your sense of smell, irritation of the nasal septum, sniffling, nosebleeds, and hoarseness.

Cocaine Dangers - Is Cocaine Dangerous? - What are the Dangers?

Injecting can lead to puncture marks, collapsed veins, localized and systemic infection and allergic reactions. Use over a long time period can also lead to addiction, depression, isolation from family and friends, psychosis, paranoia, and severe respiratory infections.

But because I had access to it, I started doing coke by myself. Tolerance means that you need increasingly larger amounts of the drug to get the same feeling because your body is building up a resistance to its effects.

Cocaine Dangers - Is Cocaine Dangerous? - What are the Dangers?

With repeated use, the body becomes dependent on, or acclimated to the presence of the drug to elicit any good feelings. Addiction occurs when you feel the compulsion to keep using in the face of personal and professional troubles caused by the substance use.

Risk for addiction increases when there is an untreated mental or physical health concern that the abuse masks. Some will self-medicate with illicit substances—meaning that they address their current problem through use of cocaine.

The dangers of using cocaine

Signs of Addiction Drug addiction is often marked by: Taking risks you would not ordinarily take, such as driving while high or stealing to have enough money for drugs.

Abandoning and neglecting life priorities.

The dangers of using cocaine

Experiencing troubled relationships due to more emphasis on drug use. Entanglements with the legal system. Continuing to use despite significant negative consequences. The most common effect of cocaine withdrawal is a "crash.Cocaine is an addictive drugs that poses risks for dependence and health dangers including: nose bleeds and collapse; central nervous, .

Cocaine use also comes with numerous risks and side effects. In , over , Americans sought medical attention in an emergency department (ED) for an adverse reaction to the misuse or use of cocaine, according to the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN), and this accounts for more than 40 percent of all ED visits involving illicit drug use or misuse.

About Cocaine

Cocaine Dangers. The main health risk with cocaine is overdose. Most cocaine deaths have been caused by accidental overdose, especially with cocaine dissolved in drinks. There is no such thing as a "safe" dose of coke, and a person can overdose even if they have . But the more you use cocaine, the more your brain will adapt to it.

You’ll need a stronger dose to feel the same high.

What are the long-term effects of cocaine? The phrase “dope fiend” was originally coined many years ago to describe the negative side effects of constant cocaine use. As tolerance to the drug increases, it becomes necessary to take greater and greater quantities to get the same high. The short- and long-term effects of cocaine use and abuse cause a wide variety of health issues from mild to severe. Whether you snort, inject, or smoke cocaine, this illegal drug is a strong central nervous system stimulant that affects your brain's processing of dopamine, a brain chemical associated with pleasure and movement. This can lead to a dangerous addiction or overdose. Stronger, more frequent doses can also cause long-term changes in your brain’s chemistry. Your body and mind begin to rely on the drug.

You’ll need a stronger dose to feel the same high. This can lead to a dangerous addiction or overdose. Cocaine Dangers. The main health risk with cocaine is overdose.

What is cocaine?

Most cocaine deaths have been caused by accidental overdose, especially with cocaine dissolved in drinks. There is no such thing as a "safe" dose of coke, and a person can overdose even if they have only ingested a relatively small amount of the drug.

Although health care providers can use it for valid medical purposes, such as local anesthesia for some surgeries, recreational cocaine use is illegal. As a street drug, cocaine looks like a fine, white, crystal powder.

Effects of Crack Cocaine | Short- & Long-Term Effects & Help